I know I am 5 days late in writing this piece (or 20 years, but who’s counting?)

Inevitably I find myself every December thinking about all the massive changes I will make, all the goals I will crush for the following year, and every year I disappoint myself by falling short of some grand visions.

Why is that?

Who can Say? One reason might just be that I am focusing on the wrong things. I focus on a weight loss goal, or a complete restriction of a certain kind of food, or other unrealistic prohibition that I have no strategic means of achieving.

So, this year, it is different.

This year, I am focus on things I can achieve by broadening my focus. By articulating something less specific, but just as impactful. By envisioning an outcome for me that might be harder to measure, but just as important to my overall contributions to society, my career, and my partnerships.

 

So here, with help from my friends over at AARP (don’t laugh – just wail til your 50th birthday when the obvious solicitations start for you, too.)

Tips for setting intentions:

  1. Choose a broad, less specific goal for an intention than you would for a resolution: For example, improving health, lowering stress, or becoming more mindful or present. (“How to Set Intentions Instead of Resolutions for 2021 – AARP”)
  2. Get specific about ways to achieve that intention. For example, using less technology, spending more time in nature, or meditating. (“How to Set Intentions Instead of Resolutions for 2021 – AARP”)
  3. Plan how to incorporate those efforts into your regular routines.
  4. Use a journal to make note of your intentions and your successes as the year continues.

 

Let me give you an example:

One of my main intentions for 2022 is to give a TED Talk quality presentation to a group.

It is broad. It is non-specific. And yes. It might be hard to measure.

I know that my value as coach, speaker, motivator, and overall resource to the print industry lies in my ability to connect with people in an authentic way. So that people remember what I have said, and, if it resonates for them, for them to make a change that might improve something in their lives.

I also know that the true measure lies both in how other people receive my words, but also in how I assess my own performance. And, like many of you, I’m sure, I can be my own worst critic.

I do not truly know how I will know when I have achieved Ted Talk quality. But I feel like I’ll just know. Yes, the audiences’ words after the fact will matter, but I just know I will know. And I haven‘t gotten there yet.

Perhaps this will be my year.

Here is where I set the intention.

What are your intentions for 2022?